Banner Image

History 2307: Europe Divided and United, 1939-1995: Home

Library resources that support Holger Lowendorf's fall '08 history course, Europe Divided and United, 1939-1995

Welcome!

This libguide can help you to complete the research paper for Europe Divided and United, 1939-1945. Use the guide to find background information, books, journal articles, and primary sources.

Questions? Wish to schedule a research consultation? See my Contact Info in right-hand column.

Reference Shelf

Consult traditional reference books to explore possible research topics. Reference books help researchers contextualize their topics and in turn begin to ask the right questions. Reference books set the stage for more efficient database searching; researchers cannot elicit relevant search results if they don't know which keywords (or search terms) to use. Last but not least, scholarly reference books contain bibliographies that can lead researchers to the most respected secondary and most useful primary sources.

Research Paper - Compile a Bibliography (5% of your grade)

Researchers must be able to identify the most respected scholarly works on any given topic. One way to do this is simply to ask someone who knows, often your professor or a librarian. A generally more comprehensive method is to consult a published bibliography. Bibliographies range in length from whole books to "Works Cited" sections in scholarly books and journal articles to "Further Reading" sections following encyclopedia articles. For this assignment you must compile your own bibliography consisting of at least ten diversified primary and secondary sources.

In Diamond and other library catalogs the term Bibliography is used as a sub-heading in the Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) field to identify bibliographical works. Enter one or more terms related to your topic into the pre-formatted text box below to retrieve bibliographies available at Temple University Libraries. Once you have found a relevant bibliography, examine it carefully for potential sources for your paper.

Research Paper - Find SECONDARY Sources

The following Temple databases index and in many cases provide full-text access to the peer-reviewed journal literature, i.e. secondary literature, of European history during the period 1939 to 1995.

Track down the full-text article, if not already available in the database, by clicking on the TULink icon:

Note: Digital archives such as JSTOR and Periodicals Archive Online (PAO) can be considered primary-source databases depending upon the researcher's purpose.

Research Paper - Find PRIMARY Sources

The majority of primary sources remain available only in paper. Such sources can take the form of reproductions of letters and diaries published in commonly-held books, or rare manuscripts available only in a single archive. Identify primary-source documents in Diamond by looking for certain LCSH sub-headings: Sources, Personal Narratives, Pictorial Works, etc.. Examples:

Additional primary-source documents on post-war Europe can be found in these Temple databases:

World War II on the Internet - Primary Source Docs

Click on the "i" icon next to the name of the website for more information.

Guide Author

David C. Murray
Contact:
Office: Paley Library, Room 319

Phone: 215-204-4250
Website / Blog PageSkype Contact

World War II Posters

Source: World War II Poster Collection, Northwestern University Libraries

Chicago Manual of Style

RefWorks

Manage your citations with RefWorks, a tool that allows researchers to easily import, export, search, and create automatically formatted bibliographies online. Citations found via searches in library databases such as JSTOR can be imported directly into RefWorks. No manual typing required. Bibliographies can be generated within RefWorks and then exported into Word using any of dozens of citation formats (MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.).

EuroDocs

EuroDocs

EuroDocs is an online directory of primary documents in Western European history compiled by Richard Hacken, librarian at Brigham Young University.

Highly recommended.

More Help

For more help locating primary sources see the History (Primary Sources Only) libguide.