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Journalism and Globalization: JRN 3706

Research help for the course, Journalism and Globalization.

Why Use News Databases?

news sourcesMost news sources have websites with news and historical archives. However, Temple Libraries subscribes to a number of news databases that offer advantages over searching news sources directly on the Web:

  • Search more than one news source at the same time
  • Powerful keyword search engines
  • Deep historic news archives
  • Access to content that costs money on the Web

Content adapted from "Newspapers as a research tool" from the University of Utah Libraries.

Find Newspapers & Magazines

The following news databases are best bets for your project:


The following news databases contain more specialized or historical news sources:

Newspaper & Magazine Look-up

Want to know if we have a specific newspaper or magazine (e.g. The New York Times, Rolling Stone, Variety)?  Use the search box to find full-text online or print newspapers and magazines:

Search Tips

  • Tips!Consider which search terms you want to use. Search terms could be names of individuals, groups, or companies; specific places or events; names/titles of laws or legislation; particular catch phrases or quotes, etc.
     
  • Consider how you want to combine your search terms. 
    • AND -- lets you make demANDS on your search. Useful when you have different concepts.
                  Example: Trump and "travel ban"
    • OR --  gives you mORe to review. Useful when you have search terms that mean the same thing. 
      ​           Example: ship or vessel or boat
    • NOT (sometimes AND NOT) -- lets you focus your search. Useful when you want to distinguish what not to see in your results list.
                  Example: Apple not pie
       
  • Consider where you want your search terms to appear. Some news databases offer options, such as whether search terms should appear in the Title, Headline, Lead Sections, or Body of the story. Where you want your search terms to appear can impact the number of (relevant) search results you see. 
    Examples of search term location fields
     
  • Place quotation marks around names and/or phrases. Quotation marks force the database to search for those search terms in the specific order. Useful when search terms might be considered common or generic but have a special meaning when combined together. Examples: "big, beautiful wall" or "Theresa May" or "travel ban"
     
  • Limit your search to a specific region, nation, or state. If your initial search results produce far too many things to review, try narrowing to a specific geographic location, if possible. This might be in relation to where the news story originates or from where the news story was written.
     
  • Limit to a specific source type. If your initial search results produce far too many things to review, try narrowing to a certain kind of news source. News databases contain content from newspapers, magazines, news blogs, newswires, news broadcasts, and more. 
     
  • Limit your search to a specific publicationIf your initial search results produce far too many things to review, try narrowing to a specific publication, such as the publication(s) that contain the most stories on your topic, publication(s) that have a desired market or audience, publication(s) that are from mainstream press or ethnic press or alternative press, etc.
     
  • Limit your search to a specific timeframe. If your initial search results produce far too many things to review, try narrowing to a specific year, month, week, or even day.