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The Historian's Craft: HIST 2001 LRS

Resources and strategies for the history methodology course Historian's Craft

Chicago Manual of Style

Chicago Citation Style Tips

The Chicago Manual of Style requires both footnotes and a bibliography. These entries are formatted differently. 

Create footnotes using the References tab in Microsoft Word or the Insert tab in Google docs.

Sample Footnote: 

1. Beate Fieseler, Michaela M. Hampf, and Jutta Schwarzkopf, "Gendering Combat: Military Women's Status in Britain, the United States, and the Soviet Union during the Second World War" Women's Studies International Forum 47, Part A (November-December 2014): 115, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wsif.2014.06.011.

If you reuse the same source in your paper, you should use shortened notes after the first entry.

Sample Shortened Note:

Fieseler, Hampf, and Schwarzkopf, "Gendering Combat," 117.

Sample Bibliography Entry:

Fieseler, Beate, Michaela M. Hampf, and Jutta Schwarzkopf. "Gendering Combat: Military Women's Status in Britain, the United States, and the Soviet Union during the Second World War." Women's Studies International Forum 47, Part A (November-December 2014): 115-126. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wsif.2014.06.011.

(The lines after the first should be indented in your bibliography)

Resources for Chicago Style Help

Why cite?

 

  1. To credit authors or artists whose arguments, ideas, or creative works you've used
  2. To allow people reviewing your work to check your sources for accuracy
  3. To allow readers to understand how you came up with your arguments
  4. To provide scholars with further sources for their own research
  5. To avoid plagiarism

Citation Generator

RefWorks - Tool for Managing Citations

Use with caution. Not all citations are 100% accurate. Some miss finer details like capitalization or punctuation. Proof the final citations according to a style manual.

RefWorks Icon

Manage your citations with RefWorks, a tool that allows researchers to easily import, export, search, and create automatically formatted bibliographies online. Citations found via searches in library databases such as JSTOR and many other databases can be imported directly into RefWorks. No manual typing required. Bibliographies generated within RefWorks can then be exported to Word in virtually any citation format, e.g. MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian and others.